Skip Navigation

Main sections

Skip section navigation (navigation may have changed)

Section navigation

girlshealth.gov logo

http://www.girlshealth.gov/

Sisters and brothers

top green border

Two sisters not getting along.

Jenny and her sister Sarah fight all the time. Jenny is mad at Sarah because she follows her wherever she goes. Sarah says that Jenny yells too much and spends all her time on the phone.

bottom green border

 

Sisters and brothers can be your best friends and your worst enemies. Sometimes you get along great and sometimes you argue. This is all part of growing up together! You may get angry if your sister takes something that is yours, goes into your room, or bothers you when you have friends over. Your older sisters or brothers may tell you what to do. Your younger sisters or brothers may borrow your things without asking or want to be around you all the time.

If you are having a hard time with your sisters and brothers, make rules and talk things out. Really listen to what your sister or brother has to say.

 

(If the tool above does not appear, please take a look at our text version of this tool.
Viewing the above requires the Adobe Flash Player.)

Do you have a sister or brother who has an illness or disability? Do you take care of someone in your family?

How can you build a good relationship with your brother or sister? Do fun things together like go for a bike ride or watch a movie. This will give you a chance to get to know each other as friends and have fun together.

Remember: there are lots of great things about having sisters and brothers. They can:

  • Be instant playmates
  • Cheer you on when you win
  • Comfort you when you lose
  • Teach you how to share
  • Help you talk with your mom and/or dad

Dealing with special issues

Sometimes, your fights or worries may seem more serious if you think your family is “different.” You may have step or half sisters or brothers, parents or a sister or brother who has an illness or disability, or sisters or brothers who are adopted or foster members of your family. You may have to take special care of brothers or sisters while your parents/guardians are working. But what really makes your family unique is your own rules, your own special traditions, and your own fights. Each family is different and that’s what all families have in common!

 

Content last reviewed September 22, 2009
Page last updated October 31, 2013

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health.

top