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Bullying for parents : en Español

Girl crying while mother comforts her.

Bullying basics

Girls can learn about many aspects of bullying from girlshealth.gov. They can learn about cyberbullying, get prevention tips, read quotes about bullying, and more.

You can print our one-page bullying fact sheet [pdf icon PDF 180K] for girls. We also have a one-page sheet with tips on bullying for parents and caregivers [pdf icon PDF 194K].

Stopbullying.gov is a great resource on many bullying topics.

Sometimes people think that bullying is just a part of growing up. Or they think it's not a problem at their child's school. But the truth is that bullying is a common and serious problem in the United States.

Around 1 out of 4 teens was bullied during a recent school year. And kids who are bullied or who bully others are more likely to be depressed, get lower grades, and have other problems. The problems can even continue into adulthood.

Girls are more likely to be bullied at school than boys, according to a study of high schoolers. Girls are more likely than boys to be bullied through rumors or being left out on purpose. And girls may be more likely than boys to cyberbully.

You can make a big difference in a girl’s life. Be clear that bullying is never okay. You can learn about signs of bullying, ways to help a girl who is bullied, and cyberbullying. Learn how to help a girl who bullies, too.

Even if you think bullying isn't an issue for your girl now, show her that you are interested and available. Ask questions like these:

  • How are things going at school?
  • What do you think of the kids in your class?
  • Are kids sometimes mean? How?
  • Are girls sometimes mean in secret ways? How?
  • What would you do if you were bullied?

You can help prevent bullying. You and your child can look together at our tips to prevent being bullied and how a girl can help if she sees bullying. Talk about ways to build her self-esteem, make friends, and pursue her interests. All of these may help prevent bullying — and will generally make her life better. And remember to tell her that she never deserves to be mistreated.

The power of parents

Studies show that having warm or supportive parents may lower the chances that kids will be bullied or bully others. Make sure to set aside time to spend with your girl, such as eating dinner together. And let your girl know what you like about her and how much you love her.

Think about school

A great way to help prevent bullying is to get involved in a child's school. Find out if the school has an anti-bullying program and whether the staff is trained in how to handle bullying. Ask how you can help the school build an atmosphere of acceptance and support.

 

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Content last reviewed April 15, 2014
Page last updated September 30, 2014

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