Skip Navigation

Main sections

Skip section navigation (navigation may have changed)

Section navigation

girlshealth.gov logo

http://www.girlshealth.gov/

Resources by topic

Click a topic to jump to related resource listings.

Addiction recovery 
AIDS prevention guidelines
Alcohol use
Alcohol use websites for teens
American School Health Association
Asthma
At-risk adolescents
Bike safety
Bone health 
Bullying
Career planning
Character education
Diabetes
Dietary guidelines
Disabilities and physical activity
Disability education resources
Disaster preparedness
Drug use information and tools
Drug-free school programs
Drug use statistics
Drug use websites for teens
Eating disorders
Education Resources Information Center (ERIC)
Emotional health
Fact sheets from girlshealth.gov
Family and community engagement
Flu
Food safety
Gangs
Girls’ health
Health education programs that work
Health news
Health risk behaviors
 
null

Individualized education programs
Internet Safety
Intimate partner violence
Learning disabilities
Medicine safety
Meningitis
Mental health guidelines
Nutrition
Obesity prevention
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)
Physical activity
Reproductive health
Safety
Safety guidelines
School health guidelines
School violence
School safety
Service learning
Sexual assault
Sexual health
Sexually transmitted infections
Smoking and athletics
Smoking prevention
Smoking statistics
Special education resources
Sun safety
Teen pregnancy
Terrorism 
Traumatic stress
Unintentional injury
Youth suicide
Youth violence
 


rule break
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

rule break

Addiction recovery  top

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has created a webinar series on girls' behavioral health. "Girls Matter" provides research and best practices on such topics as girls and substance abuse, anxiety and depression, social media, and promoting recovery from mental health problems. Hosted live monthly from February 2014 through July 2014, the webinars also will be archived.

The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,  links to a Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator.

NIDA Goes Back to School  is your source of free information about the latest drug abuse publications and teaching materials from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. You’ll find specific curricula and other teaching aids on this site.

The Mind Over Matter: Teacher's Guide is a guide to the Mind Over Matter series, which is designed to encourage young people in grades five through nine to learn about the effects of drug abuse on the body and the brain.

For a list of materials for teachers about teaching kids about drug abuse and addiction go to NIDA’sparents and teachers page . 

The Brain: Understanding Neurobiology Through the Study of Addiction  is a free curriculum for teachers of students in grades 9-12.  It provides current, research-based information on various aspects of drug abuse and addiction, including neurobiology, behavioral components, and treatment.

The Drug Strategies site is a companion to the Drug Strategies publication Treating Teens: A Guide to Adolescent Drug Programs. It provides information on treating teens for substance abuse, a list of substance abuse program especially for teens in each state, and a description of each program.

AIDS prevention  top

The Guidelines for Effective School Health Education to Prevent the Spread of AIDS  are presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The guidelines were developed to help school personnel and others plan, implement, and evaluate educational efforts to prevent HIV infection among elementary school, middle school, and high school youth.

Advocates for Youth  helps young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Their HIV/STI Prevention and Treatment among Youth in the U.S. page contains publications, lesson plans, statistics, pamphlets, and facts about HIV prevention among adolescents. They also produce a publication called  Science and Success: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections (PDF - 694KB).

Alcohol use   top

A report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration provides information on educating communities about underage drinking, including case studies on hosting successful events.

This Center for Disease Control and Prevention web site provides statistics on alcohol and drug use among teens  and links to other resources offering data and publications

Understanding Alcohol: Investigations into Biology and Behavior  is a program of the National Institutes of Health for grades 7-8 that teaches students about the science underlying the effects of alcohol on human biology and behavior.

The National Adolescent Health Information Center has compiled an informative Fact Sheet on Substance Use: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 315KB) . Adobe PDF document  It highlights statistics about adolescent substance abuse, cigarette smoking, binge drinking, and illicit drug use including marijuana and ecstasy, and other eye-opening facts about today’s youth.

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s fact sheet, Sobering Facts on Alcohol and Teen Pregnancy (PDF - 35KB)  Adobe PDF document , discusses how alcohol consumption can lead to teen pregnancy

Alcohol use websites for teens  top

The girlshealth.gov web site offers information that you can print and distribute on alcohol, drugs, and smoking. This alcohol section includes a diagram showing how alcohol affects the body, a drug glossary, and a quiz on the contents of a cigarette.

Abovetheinfluence.com  – Above the Influence is an interactive drug prevention site for youth. It features some popular anti-drug commercials that you might have seen on TV!

The Cool Spot  web site was created for kids 11 to13 years old by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). The NIAAA is the lead U.S. agency supporting research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of alcohol problems. Your students can find facts on alcohol and peer pressure on this site.

Check Yourself  – Check Yourself is a unique web site that has quizzes about different drugs, stories from real teens, message boards, videos, and other fun interactive features. You can even play decision games to see how you might act in a situation involving drugs and alcohol. What choices will you make? 

American School Health Association  top

The American School Health Association External link unites the many professionals working in schools who are committed to safeguarding the health of school-aged children. The Association, a multidisciplinary organization of administrators, counselors, dentists, health educators, physical educators, school nurses, and school physicians, advocates high-quality school health instruction, health services, and a healthful school environment.

Asthma  top

Asthma is a major public health problem of increasing concern in the United States. On average, in a classroom of 30 children, about three are likely to have asthma. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offer facts on asthma and information on school health policies and programs  on this web page.

Managing Asthma: A Guide for Schools (PDF - 1MB)  Adobe PDF document , from the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, allows you can put a simple-to-follow asthma-friendly program in place in your school. It includes easily reproducible information sheets on how peak flow meters and metered-dose inhalers work, a fill-in asthma action plan template students with asthma to keep on file, an information sheet on the early signs of an asthma attack, and more.

The Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, sponsors a program calledManaging Asthma in the School Environment, which provides free publications for educators.

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s National Asthma Education and Prevention Program contains guidelines for schools and other publications about asthma control in school, including Asthma and Physical Activity in the School (PDF - 210KB). Adobe PDF document 

At-risk adolescents  top

Helping America’s Youth is a nationwide effort to benefit children and teenagers by encouraging action in three key areas: family, school, and community.

FindYouthInfo.gov provides interactive tools and other resources to help youth-serving organizations and community partnerships plan, implement, and participate in effective programs for youth.

The YouthARTS External link web site explains how to plan, run, provide, training, and evaluate, arts programs for at-risk youth.

 

Bike safety  top

A free bicycle safety curriculum is available for physical education teachers and recreation specialists who work with students in grades 6–12.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Bicycle Safety Program uses education, outreach, enforcement, and legislation to reduce bicycle injuries and fatalities.

The Good Practices Guide: For Bicycle Safety Education (PDF - 441KB)  Adobe PDF document is a publication issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation as a resource for community leaders, educators, and parents. It provides a summary of conclusions to consider when planning a bicycle safety education course for different audiences.

The National Center for Safe Routes to School  produces a guide  with information about starting your own safe routes to school program, including guidelines for adult school crossing guards and tools to create school route maps.

The Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center  web site addresses bicycle safety and can be used as a resource by educators who want to obtain statistics on bicycle-related issues and bike-education.

Bone health  top

The Milk Matters Calcium Education Campaign  is dedicated to increasing calcium consumption among America's children and teens. The campaign, sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, focuses on educating people about the importance of calcium for building strong and healthy bones.

Making good choices for healthy bones should start in childhood and become habits that last. Best Bones Forever!. is a national education effort by the Office on Women's Health to help girls build strong bones. This web site is something all of your female students should check out! The campaign also has a bone health site for parents, offering information to help their daughters build strong bones during the critical window of bone growth—ages 9 to 12.

Bullying  top

This resource from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers research on the relationship between bullying and suicide, as well as evidence-based suggestions to help prevent bullying and suicide-related behaviors in schools.

The girlshealth.gov web site offers an extensive list of resources on bullying prevention and management for educators and school administrators. Printable information for students is available ongirlshealth.gov. This special section on bullying includes quizzes for students to find out if they have ever been bullied or if they bully others themselves, as well as helpful tips for handling bullying.

Career planning  top

Schools and agencies can help ensure that students and families get useful information about job opportunities. Learn more in this joint letter from the U.S. Departments of Education, Labor, and Health and Human Services.

If you have students looking for helpful tips on planning for the future, you can print and distribute information from this special section of the girlshealth.gov web site. The section includes information on different career options and how to plan ahead.

Students.gov is a cooperative effort between Federal agencies, students, and members of the higher education community, under the leadership of the U.S. Department of Education. The site provides teens with information about career development and education planning.

The Career One Stop web site is a Federal and non-profit online collaboration providing detailed information on training and education about planning to meet career goals.

Career Launch, from the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, helps students explore what career is right for them, search for colleges, and more.

The Internet Public Library’s Career Paths from the University of Michigan provides links to resources for students on choosing careers and planning ahead.

MyFuture.com, from the U.S. Department of Defense, has information and resources about choosing a career, job-hunting, finances, and careers in the military.

Character education  top

The Center for the Advancement of Ethics and Character  at the Boston University School of Education offers resources for educators about character education.

Character Counts  provides free teaching tools  for teachers about character traits.

The Character Education Network  provides ready-to-use curriculum, activities, and resources to integrate into your classroom about character education.

The Character Education Partnership  is a nonpartisan coalition of organizations and individuals dedicated to developing moral character and civic virtue in our nation's youth as one means of creating a more compassionate and responsible society. The organization’s web site offers interactive tools for educators and others who work with youth on character building.

Diabetes  top

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel (PDF - 1.42MB) Adobe PDF document is an online guide from the National Diabetes Education Program. This guide was developed to educate and inform school personnel about diabetes, how it is managed, and how school staff members can help meet the needs of students with the disease.

The American Diabetes Association has information for schools so teachers and other personnel can understand diabetes and provide a safe environment for diabetic students.

Dietary guidelines  to

MyPyramid.gov  is the interactive web site from the United States Department of Agriculture that provides information on the food guide pyramid and dietary guidelines. It includes educational materials that can be used as handouts.

The School Nutrition Association  works to ensure all children have access to healthful school meals by providing training and resources for educators, parents, and community members.

Disabilities and physical activity  top

The girlshealth.gov web site offers extensive information about staying active for teen girls living with disabilities and illnesses. This web content on staying active can be printed and distributed to your students and patients.

The Office on Disability of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has launched a national initiative supporting physical activity for youth with disabilities, called I Can Do It – You Can Do It. Visit this site for more information about the initiative.

For research and information about physical activity for people with disabilities check out the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability.

Disability education resources  top

The girlshealth.gov web site offers extensive http://www.girlshealth.gov/disability/index.html. The information can be printed and distributed to your students and patients. The content coversbecoming independent, IEPs and succeeding at school, planning for the future, disability laws, andrelationships.

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services at the U.S. Department of Education offersinformation about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act .

LDOnline  contains information and resources on learning disabilities and individualized education. It provides a learning disabilities section specifically for teachers  that lists helpful articles on inclusion issues, interacting with parents and students, special education, and teaching strategies.

The National Organization on Disability  believes that with enforced legislation, accessible classrooms, the respect of educators, and advances in assistive technology, students with disabilities can close the education gap. The organization’s web site offers educators resources on a wide variety of education issues.

Disaster preparedness  top

The U.S. Department of Education provides crisis planning resources for educators and school administrators. This web site also provides information educators need to plan for any emergency, including natural disasters, violent incidents, and terrorist acts.

This section of FEMA’s web site offers resources to parents and teachers on how to prepare for disaster at home and at school . Fire-safety fact sheets and terrorism related resources are provided, as well as curriculum planning tools and activities to use for disaster planning in the classroom.

The article Tips for Talking to Children after a Disaster: a Guide for Parents and Teachers  is from the National Mental Health Information Center.

National School Safety and Security Services  offers consultations in school security and emergency/crisis preparedness training nationally.

Drug use information and tools  top

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) sponsors an annual National Drug Facts Week to educate young people about drug abuse. NIDA provides materials and a toolkit leaders can use to create events.

The girlshealth.gov web site offers information that you can print and distribute on alcohol, drugs, and smoking. This special section includes a diagram showing how alcohol affects the body, a drug glossary, and a quiz on the contents of a cigarette.

NIDA for Teens External link has a page specifically for parents and teachers with resources and frequently asked questions about drug use among adolescents and prevention.

NIDA Goes Back to School  is your source of free information about the latest drug abuse publications and teaching materials from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. You’ll find specific curricula and other teaching aids on this site.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse publication Preventing Drug Use Among Children and Adolescents: A Research-Based Guide for Parents, Educators, and Community Leaders (PDF - 707KB Adobe PDF document describes drug prevention strategies that work.

The Youth Tobacco Prevention section of the Centers for Disease Control offers educational materials for educators, health professionals, parents, and youth.

D.A.R.E., or Drug Abuse Resistance Education, is a program that gives kids the skills they need to avoid involvement in drugs, gangs, and violence.

Drug-free school programs  top

The Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDFS) administers, coordinates, and recommends policy for improving quality and excellence of programs and activities. OSDFS Programs provide financial assistance for activities that promote the health and well being of students, in addition to drug and violence prevention activities in elementary and secondary schools, and institutions of higher education.

Drug use statistics  top

The High School and Youth Trends publication from the National Institute on Drug Abuse examines drug use among high school students. It provides an overview of all drugs, and also looks at trends for use of specific drugs.

The Alcohol and Drug use section of The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site provides statistics on alcohol and drug use among teens and links to other resources offering data and publications.

The National Adolescent Health Information Center has compiled an informative Fact Sheet on Substance Use: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 315KB)  Adobe PDF document  It highlights statistics about adolescent substance abuse, cigarette smoking, binge drinking, and illicit drug use including marijuana and ecstasy, and other eye-opening facts about today’s youth.

Drug use websites for teens  top

Freevibe.com is a web site sponsored by the Office of National Drug Control Policy offering information about the dangers of drugs in a manner appealing to teens. This site provides drug facts, steps for helping a friend with a drug problem, personal stories from other teens, and tips for understanding media messages. 

 NIDA for Teens, from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, is designed to help teens learn about the dangers of drugs and drug abuse so they can make healthy choices. It provides facts on different drugs, information on how drugs affect the brain, and real stories from teens who have struggled with drug abuse.

The KidsHealth web site has a page for teens about Dealing with Addiction, which includes information on the physical and psychological affects of addiction as well as the path to recovery.

Eating disorders  to

 

Education Resources Information Center (ERIC)  top

The Education Resources Information Center, sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences of the U.S. Department of Education, maintains a vast database of journal and non-journal education literature.

Emotional health  top

Each year, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) and communities across the United States celebrate National Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day. A SAMHSA website offers many resources, including public service announcements and blog posts related to Awareness Day events and to children’s mental health.

A report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration shows that older teens with emotional and behavioral health conditions are more likely to have serious problems with school performance and in other areas of their lives. Learn more.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has created a webinar series on girls' behavioral health. "Girls Matter" provides research and best practices on such topics as girls and substance abuse, anxiety and depression, social media, and promoting recovery from mental health problems. Hosted live monthly from February 2014 through July 2014, the webinars also will be archived.

The girlshealth.gov web site has a special section on emotional health covering issues such as stress, depression, suicide, cutting, body image, and self esteem. This information can be printed and distributed to your students.

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on handling anger. The fact sheet Staying Cool Even When you are Hot Mad (PDF - 211KB) Adobe PDF document is one in a series that covers topics such as sun safety (PDF - 213KB) Adobe PDF document and bullying (PDF - 394KB) . Adobe PDF document

BAM! Body and Mind ™ is an online destination for kids created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Designed for kids 9-13 years old, the campaign gives them the information they need to make healthy lifestyle choices. The site also offers students interactive content to investigate health and science topics for school or for a personal interest. This "Teacher's Corner" web page is a resource for incorporating CDC health, safety, and science topics into classroom activities.

Do you have a kid in class who is poorly behaved and seemingly just trying to get attention? It is possible that serious emotional problems are the root of the problem. The article The Myth of the Bad Kid is from the National Mental Health Information Center.

One Teen at a Time! from the National Association of Social Workers, is an educational campaign that includes resources and tools to assist professionals, parents, and teens in achieving healthy and positive outcomes. The campaign focuses on building the social and emotional skills of adolescents need, as well as offering information about diversity and tolerance. 

Fact sheets from girlshealth.gov  top

girlshealth.gov has developed several fact sheets on various health topics for girls, created as PDF files. Please feel free to download, copy, and distribute as you wish.

Family and community engagement top

Parents and communities can help foster student achievement. The U.S. Department of Education offers information on how schools can build family and community engagement. Read more about the Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family-School Partnerships.

Flu  top

Seasonal Flu Information for Schools & Childcare Providers  provides educators, staff, and parents with materials and links on how to help slow the spread of colds and flu. This resource is from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Flu.gov has a page specifically for schools with checklists that can assist local educational agencies in developing and/or improving plans to prepare for and respond to an influenza pandemic.

Food safety  top

To prevent food borne illness, food safety in schools needs to be ensured. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides information about school health programs, guidelines, and national, state, and local programs .

Food Safety for Teachers  contains lesson plans, an action guide, and other resources for teachers.

 

Gangs  top

The “Why Youth Join Gangs” video, which features gang researchers and youth gang members, describes signs that a young person might be at risk for joining a gang.

Gangs and Youth: A Guide for Social Workers (PDF - 287KB)  Adobe PDF document is a part of a web-based educational campaign by the National Association of Social Workers that offers resources and tools to assist professionals, parents, and teens in achieving healthy and positive outcomes. The campaign focuses on building the social and emotional skills adolescents need, as well as offering information about diversity and tolerance.

Learn about gang trends in schools and how to spot gang versus non-gang related activity at the Gangs and School Safety web page sponsored by the National School Safety and Security Services.

Girls’ health  top

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has created a webinar series on girls' behavioral health. "Girls Matter" provides research and best practices on such topics as girls and substance abuse, anxiety and depression, social media, and promoting recovery from mental health problems. Hosted live monthly from February 2014 through July 2014, the webinars also will be archived.

The girlshealth.gov web site was created to help girls ages 10 through 16 learn about health, growing up, and issues they face. The site focuses on health topics that girls are concerned about and helps motivate them to choose healthy behaviors by using positive, supportive, and non-threatening messages. The site gives girls reliable, useful information on the health issues they will face as they become young women and tips on handling relationships with family and friends, at school and at home. All of the sections of the site can be printed and distributed.

Parents and educators can use the Center for Young Women’s Health web site to find relevant teen health information that they can share with their family. This web site also provides interactive resources for teens and links to other websites for additional health information.

Health education programs that work  top

Coordinated School Health Programs is a project that is dedicated to providing information to educators, community leaders, and family members about how to make a school health program work in their community.

The National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP), a service of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is a searchable database of interventions for the prevention and treatment of mental and substance use disorders. 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Model Programs Guide is designed to assist practitioners and communities in implementing evidence-based prevention and intervention programs that can make a difference in the lives of children and communities.

Health news  top

The World Health Organization created a multimedia, online report on adolescent health and health-related behaviors. It features data, factors that determine adolescent health, and adolescents’ thoughts on their health needs.

The Office of Adolescent Health now uses Twitter to highlight infographics on adolescent health topics. Use the hash tag #OAHpicks.

The Division of Adolescent and School Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention produces School Health Profiles on middle school and high school health policies and practices. Profiles cover topics such as teen pregnancy prevention, obesity, tobacco use, physical education, and asthma management. Data are available for states, large urban school districts, territories, and tribal governments that participate in the Profiles surveys.

Read health-related news articles from Reuters Health Information and HealthDay, plus the most recent press announcements from major medical organizations at MedlinePlus.gov.

Click here for current news on health, compiled by Healthfinder.gov.

The National Education Association’s Health Information Network offers current health news for educators.

Health risk behaviors  top

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on handling pressure to have sex too soon. The fact sheet Dealing With Pressure to Have Sex (PDF - 224KB) Adobe PDF is one in a series that covers topics such as sun safety (PDF - 213KB) Adobe PDF document and bullying (PDF - 394KB). Adobe PDF document

The Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention seeks to prevent the most serious health risk behaviors among children, adolescents, and young adults.  The DASH web site Healthy Schools! Healthy Youth!  serves as a guide for both health and education professionals.

Individualized education programs  top

The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services at the U.S. Department of Education offersinformation about the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act on its site.

The U.S. Department of Education web page "My Child's Special Needs" assists educators, parents, and state and local educational agencies in implementing the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act regarding Individualized Education Programs for children with disabilities.

The Toolkit on Teaching and Assessing Students with Disabilities from the U.S. Department of Education has information about model programs, research, technical assistance, behavior, accommodations, and more.

Internet safety  top

The Department of Homeland Security and a leading children's advocacy group have created Project iGuardian to combat online child sexual exploitation. Project partners will visit schools and youth groups across the nation to educate students about staying safe online. Learn more about the program and how to request a Project iGuardian presentation.

The girlshealth.gov web site offers information for girls on safety issues ranging from Internet safety to relationship safety. This section, which includes interactive quizzes, can be printed and distributed.

NetSmartz  sponsored by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children and Boys & Girls Clubs of America, is designed to show educators  and administrators how to use interactive materials in their classrooms, accumulate more information about Internet safety and technology, and take steps to bring their classrooms into the 21st century.

The National Cyber Security Alliance web site Stay Safe Online is dedicated to helping K-12 educators, administrators, professionals, executives, and IT administrators develop programs that help empower students, faculty, and school administrators to take personal responsibility for keeping personal and public computers secure.

It is important for both parents and educators to know about on-line safety since a lot of school-related work is done on the Internet. WiredSafety.org provides resources for teachers to ensure that they are aware of Internet safety and help students make the most of their on-line experience.

Intimate partner violence  top

A recent U.S. Department of Education blog post features resources for schools on identifying and dealing with teen dating violence and sexual assault. Learn more.

The Our Revolution campaign engages youth in a movement to prevent teen dating violence. Developed by the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence, the campaign provides posters, brochures, a facilitator's guide, and other resources.

The girlshealth.gov web site offers information for girls on how to have healthy relationships. This special section includes a quiz on healthy relationships, and all of the content can be printed and distributed.

The IPV web page  from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers statistics on issues related to intimate partner violence, including risk factors and health effects.

The National Center for Children Exposed to Violence  offers an easily accessible and comprehensiveresource center for current and historic information about children and violence. This center provides training, technical assistance, and consultation to a variety of collaborative community programs throughout the country that respond to children and families exposed to violence, including the Child Development-Community Policing Program (CD-CP) , the School Crisis Response Initiative, and the Safe Start Initiative .

The Family Violence Prevention Fund web page on teens and partner violence  contains information for teens, parents, and educators about how to combat dating violence.

The Start Strong program offers a free online toolkit on preventing teen dating violence. The toolkit provides lessons and other resources to promote healthy relationship skills among middle-schoolers. Topics covered include drawing on popular culture to engage youth, school policies and environment, and ways to use social media to teach about healthy relationships.

Learning disabilities  top

LDOnline contains information and resources on learning disabilities and individualized education. It provides a learning disabilities section specifically for teachers that lists helpful articles on inclusion issues, interacting with parents and students, special education, and teaching strategies.

LD Worldwide for educators is designed for educators who support individuals with learning disabilities of all ages. Here you will find information, suggested resources, and ideas for all levels, including infant/toddler, preschool, elementary, middle school, high school, and post-graduate.

The educators section of the National Center for Learning Disabilities web site provides educators with tools and resources to develop effective teaching practices and personalized education methods.

 

Medicine safety  top

The FDA provides an interactive educational program on-line, Medicines in My Home  which helps students learn about over-the-counter medicines and what can be found in their medicine cabinet. It provides a course description and teacher’s kit for educators to explain the risks of not taking medicines properly and why certain medications are prescribed and used.

Meningitis  top

The flu may be getting much media attention, but meningitis is also cause for concern. The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools has posted a summary of key facts about meningitis. In addition to information on disease types, prevention, and treatment, the document contains links to several state guidelines for school policies.

STOP Meningitis, a program from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases, is a public education initiative with resources for implementing meningococcal immunization recommendations for, adolescents and college-bound students.

Getting It: A Disease…A Vaccine is a program from the National Meningitis Association for educators.  It contains a video and an educator’s guide (PDF - 278KB) Adobe PDF document  free for download.  The National Meningitis Association also has Parent Teacher Awareness Programs for PTAs with tools to raise awareness in your community.

Mental health guidelines  top

The Health, Mental Health and Safety Guidelines for Schools were developed by more than 300 health, education, and safety professionals from more than 30 different national organizations. The guidelines are interactive, allowing users to search for specific recommendations on topics ranging from transportation safety to suicide prevention.

Nutrition  top

The Food and Drug Administration’s Read the Label campaign provides resources for teaching students and communities about the Nutrition Facts label.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has created a guide for school nutrition programs on locating, buying, and using locally grown and produced food. Learn more.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has created a School Nutrition Environment and Wellness Resources website to help schools implement school wellness policies. Resources include sample wellness policy language and marketing tools.

Your students and patients can find helpful nutrition information on the girlshealth.gov website. The nutrition section of the site, which includes explanations of serving sizes and Federal dietary recommendations, can be printed and distributed.

The Fruit and Veggies: More Matters web page from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers fun facts about a variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables. It also provides information on how to prepare fruits and vegetables and great tasting recipe ideas to help you meet the 5-a-day goal.

Physical inactivity and poor diet account for an estimated 400,000 deaths per year, second only to tobacco use among preventable causes of death. The Healthy Youth section from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides statistics on healthy eating, school health programs, guidelines, and national, state, and local programs.

The School Nutrition Association works to ensure all children have access to healthful school meals by providing training and resources for educators, parents, and community members.

Obesity prevention  top

girlshealth.gov has a special section on fitness that has useful publications for educators to use in preparing material to share with students.

 

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)  top

The Center for Young Women’s Health (CYWH) is an extensive web site which offers information on a wide variety of health topics of concern to young women. The information on PCOS includes a great discussion of the role of diet and nutrition in PCOS  In addition, the CYWH offers on-line chats, moderated by health professionals, for young women with PCOS.

The Kidshealth web site offers information about many health-concerns for children and teens. The PCOS information is written for adolescents and explains the condition, tests, and treatments in easy-to-understand language.

The Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Association is a nonprofit organization run by women with PCOS. The web site offers general information about PCOS and details some of the organization’s activities, including several that are specifically for teens. The organization offers PCOTeen, with message boards, chat rooms, and a mailing list specifically for adolescents. The Big Cyster program is a pen pal program that matches adolescents with older women with PCOS. Finally, Project HEART (Helping Educate And Reach Teens) is a program designed to raise PCOS awareness among adolescents.

Physical activity  top

The girlshealth.gov web site includes a special section on fitness just for girls. This section, which can be printed and distributed, includes tips for getting started, getting a good workout, and exercising safely.

BAM! Body and Mind ™ is an online destination for kids created by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Designed for kids 9-13 years old, the campaign gives them the information they need to make healthy lifestyle choices. The site also offers students interactive content to investigate health and science topics for school or for a personal interest. The “Teacher’s Corner” web page is a resource for incorporating CDC health, safety, and science topics into classroom activities.

The Physical Activity Resources for Health Professionals section of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides links to information about creating safe and healthy environments to improve levels of physical activity in the community and at school

Physical inactivity and poor diet account for an estimated 400,000 deaths per year, second only to tobacco use among preventable causes of death. The "Healthy Youth" section of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides statistics on youth and physical activity, school health programs, guidelines, and national, state, and local programs.

The National Institute of Health (NIH) Curriculum Supplement Series provides educators with materials and resources to educate students on select subject areas. The Science of Energy Balance: Calorie Intake and Physical Activity curriculum supplement helps students understand the link between science and physical health.

Reproductive health  top

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers information on how clinics and other health care providers can help promote adolescent reproductive health and reduce teen pregnancy. You can find tools and resources on such topics as trends in teen pregnancy, tips for talking with teens about reproductive health, using social media to promote pregnancy prevention, and guidelines related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Learn more.

Your students and patients can find helpful information on general adolescent development,reproductive health care, and menstruation on the girlshealth.gov web site. The site also includes special interactive tools such as a daily guide to the menstrual cycle and a guide to the body's major systems. This information can be printed and distributed.

The Office of Population Affairs collects, develops, and distributes information on family planning, adolescent pregnancy, abstinence, adoption, reproductive health care, and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and AIDS. Their site provides a list of reproductive health fact sheets and publications that you may reproduce for your students.

The National Adolescent Health Information Center has compiled an informative Fact Sheet on Reproductive Health: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 647KB). Adobe PDF document It highlights statistics on adolescent pregnancy rates and outcomes, trends in sexual activity and practices, and STD and HIV infection among adolescents of different racial backgrounds.

Safety  top

A report from the Institute of Medicine reviews the science of sports-related concussions among youth and recommends actions for schools, parents, and others to reduce the harm it causes.

The girlshealth.gov web site offers information for girls on safety issues ranging from Internet safety to relationship safety. This section, which includes interactive quizzes, can be printed and distributed.

The Teen Safe Project web page by the Center for Young Women’s Health at Children’s Hospital in Boston and the Harvard Medical School’s Center of Excellence in Women’s Health posts a facilitator’s guide and four modules for students on healthy and safe relationships, as well as other safety topics.

Safety guidelines  top

The Health, Mental Health, and Safety Guidelines for Schools were developed by more than 300 health, education, and safety professionals from more than 30 different national organizations. Parents and other supporters also contributed to the effort. The guidelines are interactive, allowing users to search for specific recommendations on topics ranging from transportation safety to suicide prevention.

School health guidelines  top.

School violence  top

This report from the Department of Justice examines tools to prevent and handle shootings and other violent crises in schools.

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on violence prevention. The fact sheet Stopping School Violence: What can you do? (PDF - 29KB) Adobe PDF document is one in a series that covers topics such as sun safety (PDF - 214KB) Adobe PDF document and bullying (PDF - 395KB) Adobe PDF document and others.

Homicide remains the second leading cause of death for adolescents and young adults. This and other statistics about violent crimes are compiled in the National Adolescent Health Information Center’s Fact Sheet on Violence: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 509KB) . Adobe PDF document

The National Center for Children Exposed to Violence  offers statistics, links to helpful websites, and references on school violence.

SAVE, or Students Against Violence Everywhere, is an organization that promotes violence awareness among students.

Student Pledge Against Gun Violence  is a campaign that culminates each year on a Day of National Concern about Young People and Gun Violence.  This web site contains books, articles, downloadable materials, and more for teachers to use in their classrooms.

TeachSafeSchools.org  provides evidence-based information and techniques to assist the school community in the prevention of school violence

School safety  top

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Hazard produced the School Chemistry Laboratory Safety Guide for high school science and chemistry laboratories. It provides practical safety information in a checklist format useful to both groups to reduce chemical injuries in a laboratory environment.

The National Mental Health Information Center offers links to websites that provide information aboutreducing drug, alcohol, and tobacco use and promoting safe schools.

Early Warning, Timely Response: A Guide to Safe Schools is a publication of the Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice

Service learning  top

The National Service Learning Clearinghouse contains a database of articles, publications and service learning opportunities around the nation.

The National Service-Learning Partnership has teaching resources for educators on how to integrate service learning into their lessons.

Students in Service to America, from the National Service Learning Clearinghouse, provides links to civic education and character education resources. The site also includes tips for incorporating service learning into schools.

Sexual assault  top

NotAlone.gov provides information and resources related to sexual assault in schools. Topics for schools include legal guidelines and developing sexual assault policies.

In January 2014 the White House released Rape and Sexual Assault: A Renewed Call to Action. This report analyzes recent data, identifies those most at risk of rape and sexual assault, and describes areas for further action.

The San Diego Police Department's Sexual Assault Risk Reduction Curriculum  provides lessons for middle and high school students designed to reduce the incidence of sexual assault through risk-reduction strategies.

Sexual Violence Prevention: Beginning the Dialogue (PDF - 148KB) Adobe PDF document  identifies concepts and strategies that may be used as a foundation for planning, implementing, and evaluating sexual violence prevention activities.

Advocates for Youth has created a fact sheet on Dating Violence Among Adolescents that can be used as a discussion starter or as a supplement to the planned curriculum.

As an educator, you may be confronted by a student that has experienced sexual assault. The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network provides a confidential and free number to call if you need assistance, information in fact sheets, and resources for further information on sexual assault.

Sexual health  top

A Child Trends report on teen dating and sexual relationships addresses risky sexual behaviors among teens, influences on these behaviors, and how behaviors differ by age and other traits.

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on handling pressure to have sex too soon. The fact sheet Dealing With Pressure to Have Sex (PDF - 225KB) Adobe PDF document is one in a series that covers topics such as sun safety (PDF - 214KB) Adobe PDF document and bullying (PDF - 395KB). Adobe PDF document It can be found in the abstinence section of girlshealth.gov, along with other useful tools.

The Office of Population Affairs collects, develops, and distributes information on family planning, adolescent pregnancy, abstinence, adoption, reproductive health care, and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and AIDS. Their site provides a list of reproductive health fact sheets and publications that you may reproduce for your students.

The National Adolescent Health Information Center has compiled an informative Fact Sheet on Reproductive Health: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 647KB). Adobe PDF document It highlights statistics on adolescent pregnancy rates and outcomes, trends in sexual activity and practices, and STD and HIV infection among adolescents of different racial backgrounds.

Advocates for Youth provides lesson plans for educators about body image, contraception, gender roles, and more.

Sexually transmitted infections  top

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on handling pressure to have sex too soon. The fact sheet Dealing With Pressure to Have Sex (PDF - 225KB) Adobe PDF document is one in a series and can be found in the abstinence section of girlshealth.gov, along with other useful tools.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides facts, trends, and resources on sexually transmitted infections on this web page.

This publication from a national coalition of programs on sexually transmitted infections explains how schools, health systems, community centers, and these programs can help provide teens with STI services.

Smoking prevention  top

The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress, a 2014 report from the surgeon general, covers such topics as teen smoking rates and the health and economic costs of smoking.

The girlshealth.gov web site offers information that you can print and distribute on alcohol, drugs, and smoking. This special section includes a page with a diagram showing how alcohol affects the body, a drug glossary, and a quiz on the contents of a cigarette.

Read the Surgeon General's 2004 report on the health effects of smoking on this site, which offers an interactive tool showing how specific body parts are negatively affected by smoking. The site also covers the many benefits of quitting.

The Centers for Disease Control and Preventions’ Youth Tobacco Prevention offers links to many resources.

Smoking statistics  top

This Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web page provides statistics on smoking among teens and links to other resources offering data and publications.

The National Adolescent Health Information Center has compiled an informative Fact Sheet on Substance Use: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 315KB). Adobe PDF document  It highlights statistics about adolescent substance abuse, cigarette smoking, binge drinking, and illicit drug use including marijuana and ecstasy, and other eye-opening facts about today’s youth.

Special education resources  top

This blog post describes a website teens created to highlight provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the rights of students with disabilities.

The Office of Special Education Programs Technical Assistance and Dissemination (TA&D) Network web site describes a network of more than 40 information and technical assistance projects funded by the U.S. Department of Education on a broad range of disability and special education issues.

Visit the web site of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for information about special education and the law.

Sun safety  top

The Burning Truth Initiative from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention promotes awareness of the dangers of too much exposure to the sun and indoor tanning beds.

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on sun safety. The fact sheet There is no Safe Sun Tan (PDF - 214KB) Adobe PDF is one in a series that covers topics such as school violence (PDF - 210KB) Adobe PDF document and bullying (PDF - 395KB). Adobe PDF document

The Guidelines for School Programs to Prevent Skin Cancer are presented by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The brochure, Sun Safety at School, What you Can Do, Adobe PDF document sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gives guidelines for school personnel to promote sun safety among faculty, staff, and students.

Shade Planning for America’s Schools (PDF - 1.8MB) Adobe PDF document is a manual from the CDC that helps schools maintain a physical environment that supports sun safety by ensuring that school grounds have adequate shade

Teen pregnancy  top

A webcast from the Office of Adolescent Health highlights the role of positive youth development in preventing teen pregnancy and other risky behaviors. The office also provides a list of resources on this topic.

A Department of Health and Human Services blog post describes federal efforts to prevent teen pregnancy and steps communities can take to address this issue.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers information on how clinics and other health care providers can help promote adolescent reproductive health and reduce teen pregnancy. You can find tools and resources on such topics as trends in teen pregnancy, tips for talking with teens about reproductive health, using social media to promote pregnancy prevention, and guidelines related to sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Learn more.

The Office of Adolescent Health created a webcast on positive youth development and its role in preventing teen pregnancy. Hosted on May 7, 2014, the webcast offers information defining positive youth development, research on its effectiveness, and more.

The U.S. Department of Education explains what schools that receive federal funding must do to support pregnant and parenting students. An online guide Adobe PDF document  answers frequently asked questions on such topics as absences, classroom assistance, and afterschool activities.

The Office on Adolescent Health launched the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Resource Center. The center offers training materials and other resources for people working to reduce teen pregnancy. Topics include choosing an evidence-based program, engaging specific groups, and how to work with partners. The center hosts podcasts and e-learning modules on preventing teen pregnancy and supporting adolescent health.

girlshealth.gov offers a fact sheet for educators to distribute to their students on handling pressure to have sex too soon. The fact sheet Dealing With Pressure to Have Sex (PDF - 225KB) Adobe PDF document is one in a series that covers topics such as sun safety (PDF - 214KB) Adobe PDF document and bullying (PDF - 395KB). Adobe PDF document It can be found in the abstinence section of girlshealth.gov, along with other useful tools.

The Office of Population Affairs collects, develops, and distributes information on family planning, adolescent pregnancy, abstinence, adoption, reproductive health care, and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and AIDS. Their site provides a list of reproductive health fact sheets and publications that you may reproduce for your students.

Advocates for Youth provides lesson plans for educators about body image, contraception, gender roles, and more.

This online publication (PDF - 478KB) Adobe PDF document from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy outlines the importance of educational communities in the prevention of teen pregnancy. The goal of the organization is to reduce the teen pregnancy rate by one-third between 1996 and 2005.

Terrorism  top

Traumatic stress  top

The article Tips for Talking to Children After a Disaster: A Guide for Parents and Teachers is from the National Mental Health Information Center which is run by the Center for Mental Health Services of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

This section of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)  web site is devoted to resources for school personnel. NCTSN works to improve care for traumatized children and their families, and improve planning for crises such as terrorist events and disasters at schools. NCTSN is funded by the Center for Mental Health Services of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

Unintentional injury  top

Increasing Teen Safety Belt Use: A Program and Literature Review is a publication from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration that examines the effectiveness of programs aimed at increasing the use of safety belts by teenagers.

Unintentional Injuries, Violence, and the Health of Young People, from the CDC, lists definitions and statistics about unintentional injury.

Youth suicide  top

The National Adolescent Health Information Center has compiled a 2006 Fact Sheet on Suicide: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 494KB) Adobe PDF document that highlights statistics comparing suicide rates among adolescents of different race and sex.

SOS: Signs of Suicide High School Program is a nationally recognized, easily implemented, cost-effective program of suicide prevention for secondary school students.

The Jason Foundation, Inc. offers a school curriculum called “A Promise for Tomorrow” for grades 7 through 12 about the awareness and prevention of youth suicide.

The Youth Suicide Prevention School-Based Guide provides a framework for schools to assess their existing or proposed suicide prevention efforts (through a series of checklists) and provides resources and information that school administrators can use to enhance or add to their existing program.

Youth violence  top

The U.S. Departments of Education and Justice offer a school discipline guidance package to help states, districts, and schools create positive school climates and respond to student misbehavior fairly and effectively.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web site offers statistics and prevention strategies on youth injury and violence (including suicide) for educators and health professionals.

Youth Violence: A Report of the Surgeon General examines the factors that lead young people to gravitate toward violence, reviews the factors that protect youth from perpetrating violence, and identifies effective research-based preventive strategies.

Homicide remains the second leading cause of death for adolescents and young adults. This and other statistics about violent crimes are compiled in the National Adolescent Health Information Center’s Fact Sheet on Violence: Adolescents & Young Adults (PDF - 509KB). Adobe PDF document

Student Pledge Against Gun Violence  is a campaign that culminates each year on a Day of National Concern about Young People and Gun Violence.  This web site contains books, articles, downloadable materials, and more for teachers to use in their classrooms.

 

Adobe PDF Document = You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader® to view some of these files after you've downloaded them. If you have problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®.

Content last reviewed August 22, 2011
Page last updated July 15, 2014

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health.

top