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How to stop bullying at school

Anti-bullying Pledge

Click on the image above to get a PDF of our pledge.
[pdf icon PDF 594K]

You can be someone who stops bullying before it even starts. How cool is that! Here are some ways to beat bullying at your school.

  • Stand up for people who are bullied. Bullies often want an audience and approval. Let bullies know that you do not think being mean is cool.
  • Take an anti-bullying pledge. Print out our pledge to stand up against bullying. Share it with your friends, and let people know what you believe. And share our anti-bullying image on Facebook too.
  • Take action. See if you can start an anti-bullying club or prevention program at your school.
  • Talk to other kids. Try to learn more about where bullying happens at your school. Talk about what might help. See if you and some friends can go together to talk to an adult at school.
  • Talk to your teachers or principal. Let adults at school know that you care about this topic. Ask the school to host an assembly on bullying. Ask for an anonymous survey to learn how many kids are being bullied.
  • Talk to your parents or guardians. Your parents or guardians can ask your school to focus more on bullying. We have information for adults on the bullying page in our section for parents and caregivers.
  • Speak (and write) up! Write a blog, school newspaper article, or tweets to tackle bullying.
  • Get creative. How about starting a poster-making or rap-writing contest? Check out more cool ideas, plus tools for having a group discussion on bullying.
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A good mood

A school can have a certain feeling about it. It should feel like a place where everyone is respected and where everyone is safe. You can help make it that way by accepting and supporting others. Let people know that you are not interested in bashing anyone for any reason — not because they’re fat, poor, gay, short, or anything. You are interested in being friendly and kind. You are all about creating a good mood.

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Want to know more? Watch a video about older kids teaching younger ones to be “upstanders,” people who stand up against bullying. And you can get a toolkit for teen leaders who want to help younger kids create a bullying prevention program.

screenshot of video

 

Content last reviewed April 15,2014
Page last updated August 28, 2014

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